New Research Shows that Big Tobacco Facilitates Tobacco Smuggling

A news release by the University of Bath in the united kingdom, said that two latest research from the University’s Tobacco Control Study Group, have gathered evidence indicating that big tobacco companies remain facilitating tobacco smuggling, whilst carrying out their best to regulate the authorities that seek to avoid it.

The studies which were published in the BMJ journal, Tobacco Control, and supported by grants from Cancer tumour Study UK, have indicated that besides the fact that the world’s key tobacco companies remain facilitating tobacco smuggling, in addition they try to control the global program that might prevent it, whilst funding analyses that overestimate the degrees of such activities.

“Governments, taxes and customs authorities all over the world appear to have already been hoodwinked by industry info and tactics.”

  • Professor Anna Gilmore, Director, Tobacco Control Research Group

Previous March, Bloomberg Philanthropies declared that it had been investing $20m within an firm named Stop (Stopping Tobacco Organisations and Products), which would screen the tobacco industry, and expose any irregular activities.

Subsequently the other day, the University of Bath’s Tobacco Control Research Group, was named among the leading research resources because of this agency, with this global partnership especially aiming to identify any irregularities around low and middle income countries. Following this, the group produced two analyses indicating shady practices within the tobacco sector.

Tobacco industry settings smuggling monitor and trade system

The first study released by this research group, draws onto leaked records, indicating that the tobacco industry is undermining a significant international agreement, by going to great lengths to regulate a global track and trace system, the Illicit Trade Protocol, which was created to stop the tobacco industry from smuggling tobacco.

“This must be one of the tobacco industry’s greatest scams: not only is it still involved with tobacco smuggling, but big tobacco is positioning itself to regulate the system governments around the world have made to stop it from doing this.”

  • Professor Anna Gilmore, Director, Tobacco Control Research Group

“This must be one of the tobacco industry’s greatest scams: it’s not only still involved with tobacco smuggling, but big tobacco is positioning itself to control the system governments all over the world have made to stop it from doing this. The industry’s elaborate and underhand work involves front groupings, third parties, fake reports and obligations to the regulatory authorities designed to keep them to accounts,” discussed the Director of the Tobacco Control Study Group, Professor Anna Gilmore.

Big tobacco-funded research overestimates smuggling activity
The next study released by the study group, examined the info and reports on illicit tobacco trading that the tobacco industry itself has funded, and found that this data routinely overestimates the degrees of tobacco that are smuggled.

“Tobacco industry funded analysis can’t be trusted. No federal government should implement a monitor and trace program linked in any shape or web form to the tobacco companies.”

  • Professor Anna Gilmore, Director, Tobacco Control Research Group

“Despite far-reaching worries over industry-funded data upon this topic, tobacco companies continue to spend millions of pounds funding research in to the illicit tobacco trade. As lately as 2016 Philip Morris Internationals PMI Affect initiative pledged 100 million USD for this function. Yet, if industry-funded data consistently does not reach the expected standards of replicable academic study, we must dilemma if it possesses any employ beyond helping the industry muddy the waters on a significant public health issue,” said second writer Dr Karen Evans-Reeves.

Governments urged to crack down on tobacco industry’s irregular practices
Predicated on these findings, the study team is contacting governments and worldwide bodies, to take a closer look at Big Tobacco’s practices and ensure that any systems made to study and control tobacco smuggling happen to be completely in addition to the industry. Additionally the researchers happen to be urging authorities to make certain that there is absolutely no conflict of interest within any front side organisation for the sector.

“Governments, taxes and customs authorities all over the world appear to have already been hoodwinked by market data and strategies. It is vital that they awaken and realise how much is at stake. Tobacco market funded research can’t be trusted. No government should implement a monitor and trace system linked in any form or web form to the tobacco companies. Doing so could permit the tobacco industry’s involvement in smuggling to continue with impunity,” described Professor Gilmore.